Does adding more RAM make your computer faster?

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Tips for Adding RAM

A group of PC memory units. Maximum PC Magazine/Getty Images

Most modern computers come with two or more RAM chip slots, and anywhere from four to 16 GB pre-installed. The factory chips may be enough, depending on the use case. If you find your computer starting to drag, however, there’s an easy way to test if more RAM is needed. Open up your operating system’s task manager while running your typical programs, and check RAM use under the diagnostic section. If your computer is nearly maxing out its RAM capacity under normal operation, then an upgrade will probably speed things up quite a bit. As far as PC upgrades go, RAM is relatively cheap and simple. The procedure can usually be done with a screwdriver in a matter of minutes. If your computer is using 50 percent or less of RAM capacity under normal use, though, then this upgrade really won’t change much. In such a case, you would probably be better off with a new CPU.

There have been great strides in processor technology with the advent of 64-bit computing, and multi-core CPUs are available all over the market. Going back to our assembly line analogy; the CPU is the worker. A dual-core CPU is like having two workers, and can nearly double processing speed if it has ample RAM to work with. Six and even eight-core processors are now relatively common and affordable. Higher-end machines also have dedicated graphics processors (GPUs) which take the load of rendering graphical effects during gaming or video editing.

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Similarly to RAM, processing capacity can be checked in your operating system’s task manager. If it’s constantly getting maxed out, then it’s time for an upgrade. Replacing a CPU is much more technically involved than switching out RAM chips, so it may be best to consult a computer specialist on this procedure.

In a nutshell, installing more RAM may improve computer speed if you frequently use many programs or browsing tabs at once, or if you do memory-intensive tasks like gaming or Photoshop. Under regular use, however, a CPU upgrade will probably have a greater immediate effect on performance. Upgrading both together will ensure your PC not only runs faster, but is also able to complete more tasks at one time.

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Originally Published: Apr 1, 2000

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Does More RAM Make Computer Faster? – Computer …

incomputersolutions.com

2020-3-3 · Random Access Memory(RAM) is a faster than physical hard drives. So if you have a small quantity of RAM then the processor will handle a limited number of tasks faster. But when you have high amount RAM, your processor will handle more tasks faster. So adding additional ram makes your computer faster. Is it better […]

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How Much Does RAM Affect FPS in Games? – Tech …

techguided.com

2018-7-25 · Just like how adding more RAM can increase your FPS in certain scenarios, faster RAM can increase your performance in some situations, too. However, most benchmarks show that the performance difference between base speeds of RAM (2133MHz is the lowest speed of DDR4 memory) performs very similar—or only slightly lower—than even the highest RAM frequencies in the majority …

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How much RAM speed do I need

Answered By: Zachary Thomas Date: created: Feb 17 2021

A lightweight system today can get by with 4GB of RAM. 8GB should be plenty for current and near-term future applications, 16GB gives you comfortable space for the future, and anything over 16GB is likely overkill unless you specifically know you need it (such as for video editing or audio post-production).

Asked By: Nathan Baker Date: created: Mar 07 2021

How do I make my RAM faster

Answered By: Leonars Harris Date: created: Nov 16 2020

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AMD APUs And Fast RAM

As many will know, the new batch of AMD’s processors tend to perform better under higher speed RAM. With that in mind, we thought it would be suitable to touch upon how fast RAM boosts the performance of the new line of processors that have become such a huge hit amongst both gamers and productivity users.

Let’s start with their APU range.

An APU, or accelerated processing unit, is AMD’s answer to a processor with a powerful, built-in graphics card. AMD & Intel have both been designing some form of APU for years now, allowing customers to get a slice of both pies at a hugely reduced price. But how does an APU utilize faster RAM?

First, let’s understand how an APU works. Unlike a PC that comes with a freestanding GPU, the APU has the graphics processor integrated into the CPU.

One of the benefits of having a standalone GPU is that it comes with its own super quick onboard VRAM to use when processing graphics. The APU, on the other hand, has to utilize your computer’s system RAM – RAM that is already being utilized for other processes.

So, what’s our point? Well, faster RAM, and more of it, is extremely beneficial to your APU system – faster RAM like the kind you would find onboard a GPU.

With AMD’s CPU range, the story doesn’t really change.

Since Ryzen was released, AMD has been making use of its impressive multi-threaded nature.

Multi-threading is when a CPU can double its cores by making use of virtual cores. If your CPU has six cores, it would have 12 threads, and so on. This being said, each thread will try to access your RAM, meaning quicker RAM will be more suitable to accommodate a multi-threaded CPU over say, an Intel CPU that doesn’t have this facility.

We’re currently in the process of putting together some benchmarking results of AMD vs. Intel and how faster RAM affects them in real-world situations. Stay tuned to see those results soon.

Are there different types of RAM?

Yes, there are multiple types of RAM! As with other forms of computer hardware, scientists are always trying to decrease energy consumption while they increase speed and capacity. RAM has been around since the first days of computing, and in early microcomputing eras it required enthusiasts to plug in chips one at a time.

By the late 1990s and early 2000s, users had their choice of static RAM (SRAM), Dynamic RAM (DRAM), or Synchronous Dynamic RAM (SDRAM).

Nowadays, the most common type is DDR-RAM, and there are various iterations, including DDR2, DDR3, DDR4, and DDR5. DDR stands for double-data rate and allows multiple file transfers at the same time. Current speeds are about 25 gigabytes per second for the latest DDR4-RAM.

There are also multiple types of speeds of DDR4 memory. By default, these memory sticks run at around 2500 MHz. If you want to squeeze the absolute maximum performance out of your memory, you can get higher clocked RAM. Nowadays you’ll find memory ranging from 2333 MHz up to 5000 MHz (which is interesting for gamers and GPU overclockers). The more MHz your RAM has, the faster it is!

Eventually, DDR5 will replace DDR4, as it has even further increased performance — about 50 GB/s.

There’s also VRAM (Video Random Access Memory) which sits on your graphics card and is used for loading graphical data (such as games). Video RAM is even faster than normal memory and comes in the form of GDDR5X or HBM memory with higher bandwidths.

Memory (RAM)

A computer with more memory (RAM) is capable of st

A computer with more memory (RAM) is capable of storing more programs that are currently running in memory. If your computer runs out of memory, the computer must swap unused data stored in memory to the primary storage device until it is needed again. By adding this extra step, (and because hard drives and SSDs are the slowest types of memory), your computer can become much slower without enough memory.

What should I look out for when buying RAM? (for the geeks)

As mentioned above, today’s DDR4 RAM clocks in at around 2133 and 3000 MHz. Gamers or other hardcore computer users (such as programmers and multimedia editors) should look at higher clocked memory with specifications of up to 4800 MHz. Such memory comes from manufacturers like G.Skill or Corsair.

However, while clock speeds are one thing, the other factor that a certain audience (gamers, for example) should consider is latency, the time delay between when a command in memory is entered and when it’s executed. The lower this number, the higher the performance, as you get fewer delays between instructions. To get the best possible performance, find memory north of 4000 MHz with a latency of around CAS (Column Address Strobe) 15-18. (For regular users, this is unlikely to make a meaningful impact, but gamers should go ahead!)

Keep in mind the 32-Bit Windows versions

Last but not least, you need to keep in mind that you can’t just install infinite amounts of RAM in your PC and expect it to work. In order to use more than 4 GB of memory, you need to run a 64-Bit version of Windows — 32-bit versions are limited to address 3.5 GB of memory only. Many Windows 7 users are still on 32-bit editions, so if you want to use 4 GB of RAM or more, you will definitely need to jump on the 64-bit bandwagon. But, beware of installing a 64-bit version on a very old machine with less memory since that might have a counteracting effect. Addresses in Windows are now 64 bits long, instead of just 32 bits. What this boils down to is a larger memory footprint of each application. Depending on which applications you use, Windows 64-bit might use 20–50% more of your memory. As you can see, 64-bit only makes sense with larger system memory.

Last but not least, you need to keep in mind that you can’t just install infinite amounts of RAM in your PC and expect it to work. In order to use more than 4 GB of memory, you need to run a 64-Bit version of Windows — 32-bit versions are limited to address 3.5 GB of memory only. Many Windows 7 users are still on 32-bit editions, so if you want to use 4 GB of RAM or more, you will definitely need to jump on the 64-bit bandwagon. But, beware of installing a 64-bit version on a very old machine with less memory since that might have a counteracting effect. Addresses in Windows are now 64 bits long, instead of just 32 bits. What this boils down to is a larger memory footprint of each application. Depending on which applications you use, Windows 64-bit might use 20–50% more of your memory. As you can see, 64-bit only makes sense with larger system memory.

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