How tall is a dollar bill in inches?

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  • Carmella Winecroft

Jun 6, 2016

    Carmella Winecroft Jun 6, 2016

    “The small step videos were awesome! It was easy to finish each step then go on to the next. This is my new way to send cash to the grandkids. My mantra is, ‘It’s not what you have, it’s what you make of it’.” …” more

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Who is on the $1000 dollar bill?

There are actually two people on the $1000 dollar bill – Alexander Hamilton and President Grover Cleveland.

No, they’re not sharing a portrait. There are two people because there are two different $1000 dollar bills.

The $1,000 Series 1918 Blue Seal Bill

The first $1000 dollar bill was printed and brought into circulation in 1918. It has Alexander Hamilton’s face on the front and an eagle on the back. Here is a picture of the 1918 $1000 dollar bill:

Why Alexander Hamilton?

Why Alexander Hamilton?

Besides having a Broadway musical made about his life, Alexander Hamilton was the Founding Father who’s credited with founding the country’s financial system.

The $1000 Series 1928 Green Seal Bill

The second $1000 bill came only ten years later in 1928. This bill has the face of President Grover Cleveland on it. Here’s what this $1000 dollar note looks like:

Why Grover Cleveland? Well, he was our 22nd and 24

Why Grover Cleveland? Well, he was our 22nd and 24th president.

Did you notice what makes him special? He’s the only president (so far) to serve two non-consecutive terms.

An important point to remember is that these bills are Federal Reserve notes, not gold certificates or silver certificates.

Also, these two bills aren’t the first thousand dollar bills that the United States has seen. In fact, during the Civil War, the confederate currency included a $1000 banknote. Since these are not national banknotes, the U.S. Treasury doesn’t deem them as legal tender.

Why aren’t $1000 dollar bills used anymore?

While they’re still legal tender, high-denomination bills like the $1000 dollar bill were last printed in 1945. Then, in 1969 the Federal Reserve Bank officially discontinued them due to “lack of use”.

Originally the purpose of high-denomination bills was to help banks and the federal government make large transactions. With the introduction of the electronic money system, the use of the high-denomination paper money and large bills disappeared. Along with the higher potential for counterfeiting and use for illegal activities, it’s very unlikely that high-denomination bills are ever going to come back into circulation.

Another reason that the $1000 dollar bill was discontinued is that it wasn’t very cost-efficient. In fact, it was cheaper to print a bunch of $1 bills to match the value of the $1000 treasury note.

In the 21st century, it’s much safer and easier to carry around a credit card than a large bank note. It’s really no surprise that the Federal Reserve discontinued large size paper money. Most high-denomination bills are purely collectibles now.

Fold the Bill into 1 Sections

Once the bill is folded into thirds, it’s time to fold it further into 1″ sections. Start by folding the right edge into the right-most crease.

 Just as before, make sure the fold is even and th

Just as before, make sure the fold is even and then crease the fold.

 Repeat these steps on the left side. Start by fol

Repeat these steps on the left side. Start by folding the left edge into the left-most crease.

 Make sure the fold is even and crease.

Make sure the fold is even and crease.

 The final fold is to fold the bill exactly in hal

The final fold is to fold the bill exactly in half. As with the other folds, make sure it is even and crease tightly.

Quick conversion chart of dollar bill to cent

Quick conversion chart of dollar bill to cent

1 dollar bill to cent = 100 cent

2 dollar bill to cent = 200 cent

3 dollar bill to cent = 300 cent

4 dollar bill to cent = 400 cent

5 dollar bill to cent = 500 cent

6 dollar bill to cent = 600 cent

7 dollar bill to cent = 700 cent

8 dollar bill to cent = 800 cent

9 dollar bill to cent = 900 cent

10 dollar bill to cent = 1000 cent

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